State of the collection – the 57GS movements

A write up of the vintage Grand Seiko watches in my collection that utilise the movements from the 57GS series

Between now and the end of the year I will be posting articles on my collection of vintage Grand Seikos.

Since there are over 40 pieces in the collection, it makes sense to break this write-up over several articles. Each post will cover a specific movement – or set of movements – from the vintage Grand Seiko releases, and include photos of the watches I have that utilise that movement.

Whilst I don’t intend these articles to provide a comprehensive and thoroughly researched scholarly history of vintage Grand Seikos, I will share some knowledge on the pieces that I have picked up over the course of the last year. If I get anything wrong, please don’t hesitate to let me know!

Macro detail of the 5722B movement
Macro detail of the 5722B movement

Following on from the first Grand Seiko, based on the 3180 movement, were a series of watches now categorised as being in the 57GS family.

Three different movements were utilised over the period that the 57GS were on sale, and the three watches that I have representing these movements were made in 1963, 1965 and 1967.

Continue reading “State of the collection – the 57GS movements”

Grand Seiko 57GS variants

Here’s a shot featuring the three generations of Grand Seiko 57’s. On top, the 43999. This watch is the SD dial version, and the serial number dates it to August 1963, which is believed to be the first month of production for this model. As mentioned previously, personally I like to consider this model in its own 43 series rather than bundling it in with the others!

Underneath on the left, a 5722-9990 from 1965, and on the right, a 5722-9991 from 1967.

This is by no means representative of all variants of the vintage 57GS series, but it does cover the full range of calibres that were used. The 430 in the 43999, the 5722A in the 5722-9990, and finally the 5722B in the 5722-9991.

TBC

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Grand Seiko 5722-9000

After the first #GrandSeiko, with movement 3180, came the 57GS, and a change in the design of the medallion. The lion stayed, indicating a movement that was to chronometer standards, but unlike on the 3180, which had the text “Grand Seiko” above the lion, on these models was just the word “Seiko”. This medallion was used on models using the first two movements in the 57GS series – the 43999 (with the 430 movement), and the 5722-9000 (with the 5722A movement). The same design of medallion was also used later on for the -9000 variants of the 6245 and 6246 models from the 62GS series. Yes. It is a little confusing! #GSWednesday #Seiko

TBC

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Grand Seiko 5722-9990 – behind the scenes

Thought it would be fun to share a #BTS (behind the scenes) shot. This is a screenshot of the software that controls the #CAPcam camera that I use. In the left window you can see the red, blue, and green markers that are the defining three points that I want to be in focus. On the right, you can see in the table the physical distances from the sensor to those points. As long as those distances are correct, the camera will work out the precise movements to apply to the front standard (where the lens is mounted) in order to set a plane of focus that intersects through those three points. Simple, eh? 😜

TBC

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Grand Seiko 5722-9990

Here’s the full shot that the previous post was cropped from. The #GrandSeiko 5722-9990, from 1965, along with its original timing certificate. And if you were wondering why that engraving wasn’t all in focus, it’s because I set the focal plane to get the text at the bottom of the frame in focus, along with the “Grand Seiko” engraved text on the bridge!

TBC

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