Full Frame – Grand Seiko 4580-7010 VFA movement

Every Monday, I’ll be posting a new full resolution image that you can zoom into and pan around for yourself.

Featuring in this week’s “Full Frame” is the movement of the Grand Seiko 4580-7010. A slightly smaller – yet no less impressive – image than usual, since when tilting and swinging the focal plane to the extent that it is in this shot, I can’t get as much magnification.

Before getting onto the photograph itself, this is probably a good opportunity to clear up some confusion that is out there as to the number of 4580 movements that were created, and where they ended up.

Following the end of the Neuchatel Observatory Chronometer trials, Seiko submitted for certification a number of 4520 and 4580 movements in the years 1968 through to 1970.

In 1968, 103 examples of the 4520 caliber were submitted, of which 73 passed certification.

In 1969, 30 examples of the 4580 caliber were submitted, of which 25 passed certification.

In 1970, a further 150 examples of the 4580 caliber were submitted, of which 128 passed certification.

That much is widely written up and accepted. Where the confusion lies is how these movements were cased up and sold.

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Full Frame – Grand Seiko SBGR085

Every Monday, I’ll be posting a new full resolution image that you can zoom into and pan around for yourself.

This week’s “Full Frame”, where I share a full resolution image that you can zoom and pan around, features the Grand Seiko SBGR085 – a Wake limited edition of just 40 pieces.

As usual, I recommend you go full-screen first (the top most icon on the image on the right hand side) and then explore the watch in as much detail as you wish!

Full Frame – Patek Philippe 5204 movement

Every Monday, I’ll be posting a new full resolution image that you can zoom into and pan around for yourself.

This week’s “Full Frame” is a mere 80 megapixel shot of the movement of a Patek Philippe 5204 perpetual calendar with split-seconds chronograph. It was taken with my old Phase One IQ3 80 digital back, before I upgraded to the IQ3 100.

I’ve posted some detail cropped macro shots from this image on my Instagram account before, but now for the first time you can zoom into and pan around the entire movement and explore every detail for yourself!

If you are interested in purchasing this watch, please don’t hesitate to contact K2 Luxury, who were gracious enough to loan me the watch to shoot. You can also follow them on their Instagram account here – they do get some rather stunning pieces, and I’m very lucky to be able to occasionally photograph some of them.

Use the icons in the image below to go full screen, and then zoom into and out of the image.

Full Frame – Manufacture Royale Androgyne Tourbillon

Every Monday, I’ll be posting a new full resolution image that you can zoom into and pan around for yourself.

This week’s “Full Frame”, where I publish a 100 megapixel zoomable and panable image for you to explore features the Manufacture Royale Androgyne Tourbillon.

Not just any Androgune Tourbillon, but a “Piece Unique” skeletonised model made for a discerning collector.

As usual, I recommend you go full screen and then zoom in to see the image in all its 100 megapixel glory. Excuse the dust! It is very laborious to get rid of it all, and I only make that effort for printing 🙂

 

Full Frame – MB&F Legacy Machine Perpetual

Every Monday, I’ll be posting a new full resolution image that you can zoom into and pan around for yourself.

Going forward, I will try to be a little less haphazard with my posts to the site, and to tie-in with #macromonday on Instagram, I’ll make Monday the day that I post a new full resolution zoomable image in “Full Frame”.

This week it’s the turn of the MB&F Legacy Machine Perpetual. I shot this watch a little under a year ago, when my lighting set-up was rather more basic than it is now, so please forgive the harsh light on the case!

As usual, I recommend you go full screen and then zoom in to see the watch in all its 100 megapixel glory.

Full Frame – Girard-Perregaux Constant Escapement

Each week, I’ll be posting a new full resolution image that you can zoom into and pan around for yourself.

This week’s “Full Frame” post features the Girard-Perregaux Constant Escapement.

The image below is fully interactive, very simple to use, and enables you to fully explore the whole image at its full resolution of 100 megapixels. I recommend clicking the full screen icon, and then use the +/- icons to zoom in and out, and click-drag with your mouse (or use your finger on a touch interface) to pan around the image.

Full Frame – Greubel Forsey Double Tourbillon Technique

Each week, I’ll be posting a new full resolution image that you can zoom into and pan around for yourself.

This photo was taken with my previous medium format digital back – the Phase One IQ3 80, which provides a resolution of 10328 x 7760 pixels.

Clearly 80 megapixels is a little on the large size for Instagram, since the resolution limit for Instagram is 1,080 x 1,080 pixels. Given that I typically am posting a 4:3 aspect ratio image, that means Instagram is using around 1.5% of the captured resolution.

To demonstrate the resolution that is actually captured, I often post a “full frame” image, followed by one or more “macro” crops from that image at 100% resolution.

Greubel Forsey Double Tourbillon Technique
Greubel Forsey Double Tourbillon Technique – full frame image

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Full Frame – the A. Lange & Sohne Zeitwerk Luminous movement

Each week, I’ll be posting a new full resolution image that you can zoom into and pan around for yourself.

With my current set-up, every photo I take of a watch starts off as a 100 megapixel image. I shoot with the highest resolution sensor on the (consumer) market – the Phase One IQ3 100 medium format digital back.

Clearly 100 megapixels is a little on the large size for Instagram. Each photo coming out of the camera is 11,608 x 8,708 pixels, whereas the resolution limit for Instagram is 1,080 x 1,080 pixels. Given that I typically am posting a 4:3 aspect ratio image, that means Instagram is using well under 1% of the captured resolution.

To demonstrate the resolution that is actually captured, I often post a “full frame” image, followed by one or more “macro” crops from that image at 100% resolution.

Full frame, reduced resolution image of the A Lange & Sohne Zeitwerk Luminous
Full frame, reduced resolution image of the A Lange & Sohne Zeitwerk Luminous
Crop from the above image, demonstrating the resolution that exists across the full frame
Crop from the above image, demonstrating the resolution that exists across the full frame

For a while now, people have been asking if it is possible for me to share the full frame at full resolution, and that is what this new section on my website will enable me to do.

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