Grand Seiko 6155-8000 and 6156-8010

No historical Grand Seiko series utilizes more movements than the 61GS. No fewer than 7 different movements were used over the 6 or so years that this series were on sale.
Seen here are the “Specials”. On the left the 6155-8000, and on the right, the 6156-8010. Both of these watches are from 1970. The difference between the two movements is clear from the photo but in addition, this particular variation of the 6156 has a 3-faceted cut glass crystal.
These truly are beautiful watches. The cases in particular are so crisp.
What makes the “Special” special, is that the movements were regulated to an even greater degree of precision than the regular Grand Seiko standard. The “daily rate” was regulated to -3 > +3 seconds per day, whereas the regular Grand Seiko standard was -3 > +5. Astonishingly, these watches were actually rated to be more accurate than the modern 9S calibers.
There were some more finely adjusted Grand Seikos that were regulated to an even greater level of precision than that, and I’ll share images of one of those watches at the weekend. (Surprisingly, these Specials are not so hard to track down. Earlier this month, no fewer than 4 different dealers in Japan all had the 6156-8010 available, although it must be said that none of them were in as great condition as this sample. So if you’re after one, be patient and wait for a good one – you don’t have to panic-buy the first one that comes up for sale!)

TBC

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Grand Sieko two 6146-8050’s and a 6146-8000

Today’s group shot for #GSWednesday features three watches utilizing the 6146A caliber. This differs from the 6145 featured in the previous post by adding an indication for the day of the week.

Not such a dramatic variation in these three compared to the 6145s yesterday, but still an interesting set.

The left and center watches both have the model number 6146-8050, despite the different dial colours, and the fact the one on the left also has a faceted crystal. Both were manufactured in May 1972.

On the right is the 6146-8000 in cap gold (and I believe not with its original hands unfortunately) from May 1969.
So #watchfam, which one is your favourite – 👈,👇, or 👉?

TBC

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Grand Seiko 6145-8020 and 6145-8030

When I decided to build up a collection of vintage Grand Seikos, the original intention was to acquire one example watch of each movement. With roughly 20 different movements used over the 15 or so year history of the vintage range, it seemed a reasonable – and manageable – target to aim for.
I’ve mentioned previously that it was the watch on the right of this post – the 6145-8030 – that really was the catalyst for this little escapade. Broadly speaking, the first four digits of the model number of a vintage Grand Seiko indicate the movement that is used. It’s not quite that simple, as “A’s” and “B’s” come into play on occasion, but it’s a good enough guideline for the purpose of this post.

The watch on the left though also uses the exact same movement. It’s a 6145-8020. And as you can see, that single digit change makes a huge difference.
Suffice to say, relatively early in in my quest to build the collection, the idea of just getting a single representative example of each movement went out of the window.

I mean come on. How would I pick between these two?! And I actually have a third example of a 6145 on its way from Japan as I type this.
You may have noticed from earlier group shot posts of watches from the same series (the “First”, the 57GS, the 44GS, and the 62GS – just scroll back through my feed a couple of weeks to see these) that there were only very subtle design differences across the models that were released in each series over the course of up to 5 years. As an example, just compare the 43999, 5722-9990 and 5722-9991, from 1963, 1965, and 1967 respectively to see what I mean (posted on September 11h). To the untrained eye, they are practically identical. Almost zero changes to the aesthetics of the series over a 5 year lifespan.
For some reason – and I’d just love to know why – there was an absolute explosion in the variety of styles with the introduction of the 61GS series in 1967.
Both of these watches shown here were made not just in the same year – but in the same month. August 1969.

I’m glad I didn’t stick to my original plan. Just think what I would have missed out on!

But if you had to pick one? Which would it be… 👈, or 👉?

TBC

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Grand Seiko 6145-8030

Grand Seiko 6145-8030.
This was the model that first piqued my interest in vintage Grand Seikos, and I have been after one for almost a year. They surface very rarely these days – in fact, this was the first one I’d seen since CTI (a well known vintage watch shop in Ginza, Tokyo) sold one in 2015.

The case is solid 18k gold, and is hammered – detail of that coming later. The dial has an incredible texture that catches the light differently every time you look at it.
The crystal on this one – as you will find on most Grand Seikos from this era – is a little scratched, but no worries there. I have a replacement NOS crystal on its way to me 🙂

TBC

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